Stress, College & Your Kids

Stress, College & Your Kids

For many teenagers this is a time of excitement, new experiences and even anxiety. They may be leaving home for the first time, experiencing issues adjusting to their new schedules and new expectations or having a difficult time making new friends. 

These, and other situations, can leave a child feeling isolated and like a virtual fish out of water.

If you see your child is experiencing sadness, anxiety or any issues of adjustment do not allow time to pass before giving them the resources that they need.

Your 18, or over, dependent child can work with a Vida Coach, or therapist, of their very own. Likewise, your student can work with you and a Vida Coach or therapist if they are under 18. 

Vida Coaching is an incredible resource for your child and for you.

As the parent you may worry about whether or not your child will be happy and if they have made the right decisions. If you are paying for their college and/or living expenses you may have financial concerns. As well, you may be experiencing feelings of sadness as your little bird flies away from the nest. This may even be compounded by the fact that for the first time in your 18 year old's life you may not get information from the school, or your child's health care team, unless your child signs a release form allowing you to get that information.

With all of this change you can only imagine that you and your child can benefit from extra support. We are here to help.

Depression is the leading cause of anxiety in college aged students.

However high school juniors and seniors are not exempt. This age group is supposed to enjoy some of the best years of their lives but they often experience angst when deciding if college is the right choice for them, choosing the right college, applying for scholarships, getting good scores on ACT and SAT exams, and living up to personal and family expectations.

Be aware of the signs of depression which, according to The Mayo Clinic, can include:

  • Feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness or hopelessness
  • Angry outbursts, irritability or frustration, even over small matters
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in most or all normal activities, such as hobbies or sports
  • Sleep disturbances, including insomnia or sleeping too much
  • Tiredness and lack of energy, so even small tasks take extra effort
  • Changes in appetite — often reduced appetite and weight loss, but increased cravings for food and weight gain in some people
  • Anxiety, agitation or restlessness
  • Slowed thinking, speaking or body movements
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt, fixating on past failures, or blaming yourself for things that aren't your responsibility
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions and remembering things
  • Frequent or recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, or suicide
  • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches.
  • Academic problems not consistent with her or her previous performance.

In addition to your resources here at Vida, most college campuses offer mental health support.

If you fear that your child is in danger of hurting themselves or someone else call 911 and/or the campus police.

Vida Superstar Jacquie!

Vida Superstar Jacquie!

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A Healthy Burger for Your Labor Day BBQ