Sweat It Out

Sweat It Out

Sweating helps to regulate temperature, cool the body during stress, and remove waste products from the body. Our sweat glands release a mixture of water, salt, amino acids, proteins, and other substances. 

Sweating, although not always appreciated, can help to promote healthier skin, decrease stress hormones, boost sexual drive, reduce menopause symptoms, protect the heart, and create better brain health.

Dehydration in adults

Dehydration is a condition that occurs when the loss of body fluids, mostly water, exceeds the amount that is taken in. With dehydration, more water is moving out of our cells and bodies than what we take in through drinking.

We lose water every day in the form of water vapor in the breath we exhale and in our excreted sweat, urine, and stool. Along with the water, small amounts of salts are also lost. Hot, sunny weather can cause more sweating and increase the risk of dehydration. Very dry hot weather may disguise how much you’re sweating because of rapid evaporation.

The best way to prevent dehydration? Drink water frequently and regularly, especially before, during, and after any sweat sessions.

The signs and symptoms of dehydration range from minor to severe and include:

  • Increased thirst

  • Dry mouth and swollen tongue

  • Weakness

  • Dizziness

  • Palpitations (feeling that the heart is jumping or pounding)

  • Confusion

  • Sluggishness fainting

  • Fainting

  • Inability to sweat

  • Decreased urine output

Urine color may indicate dehydration. If urine is concentrated and deeply yellow or amber, you may be dehydrated.

When to seek medical care

Call your doctor if the dehydrated person experiences any of the following:

  • Increased or constant vomiting for more than a day

  • Fever over 101°F

  • Diarrhea for more than 2 days

  • Weight loss

  • Decreased urine production

  • Confusion

  • Weakness

Take the person to an emergency department if these situations occur:

  • Fever higher than 103°F

  • Confusion

  • Sluggishness (lethargy)

  • Headache

  • Seizures

  • Difficulty breathing

  • Chest or abdominal pains

  • Fainting

  • No urine in the last 12 hours

Fit and Cool

Fit and Cool

Hello, Sunshine

Hello, Sunshine